IC5146 The Cocoon Nebula

IC5146 The Cocoon Nebula

Takahashi FSQ 85
QSI583wsg
Mach One
20 x 10m Luminance
8 x 5m RGB respectively
-20C camera temp
B Side Gigantic American IPA

NGC 281, H-alpha, Oiii, RGB

NGC 281, H-alpha, Oiii, RGB

H-alpha = 180 minutes
OIII = 330 minutes
RGB (stars) = 60:60:60 minutes
Camera = QSI 583wsg
Telescope = TEC 140
Mount = AP Mach One
Beverage = The Glenlivet 12
Location: downtown Toronto, Canada
Date: Three nights in Aug/Sep/Oct 2014
Software = capture and alignment in Maxim DL, post-processing in PS CS5

So what is this thing?

NGC 281 is located roughly 9,200 light years away in the constellation Cassiopeia.  

The massive stars in the middle of this nebula are shaping their environment through powerful stellar winds and intense radiation.  They heat up the surrounding gas, causing it to emit light, and forming the pillars you see on the right side of the scene.  Opaque dust clouds -- dark nebulae -- block some of the light emitted by these glowing gases.

To capture all this, I combined images captured in narrow wavelengths of light emitted by oxygen and hydrogen atoms, and then later captured standard RGB frames just for the star field (stars in narrowband composites can look pretty strange).  

Thanks for looking!

van den Bergh 152

van den Bergh 152

Our galaxy is a dirty, dusty place. This is van den Bergh 152, a massive finger of dust hanging out in the constellation Cepheus. The blue patch on its fingertip is caused by reflected starlight from the bright star just inside the dust cloud. The dust itself obscures all but the brightest stars behind it. There are red hints of glowing ionized hydrogen across the lower left of the frame.

Taken from the gloriously dark skies of cottage country, an hour northeast of Peterborough, ON.

Takahashi FSQ 85
QSI583wsg
Mach One
12 x 10m Luminance
10x 5m RGB respectively
-20C camera temp
Islay Mist 8 yo scotch whiskey, as dirty and smoky as this scene

Eastern Veil Nebula (NGC 6992)

Eastern Veil Nebula (NGC 6992)

H-alpha = 270 minutes
OIII = 240 minutes
Camera = QSI 583
Telescope = TEC 140
Mount = AP Mach One
Beverage = Black Grouse scotch whiskey
Location: downtown Toronto, Canada
Date: Two nights in August 2014
Software = capture and alignment in Maxim DL, post-processing in PS CS5

IC5070, the pelican nebula

IC5070, the pelican nebula

TEC140
QSI583wsg
12 x 30m h-alpha 5nm
Mach One
-20C camera temp
Junction Conductor pale ale

Rosette Nebula HaRGB

Rosette Nebula HaRGB

Love this hole in the sky.

H-alpha layer:
TEC140
QSI583wsg
6 x 30m h-alpha 5nm
Mach One
-35C camera temp
-25C ambient temp
very cold hands
hot whiskey (Te Bhaig)

RGB layers were captured 5 (!) years ago, STL11K and TMB130

 

Sh2-129 The Flying Bat Nebula

Sh2-129 The Flying Bat Nebula

Sharpless 2-129 is an emission nebula in the constellation Cepheus.  Its emission of light comes mostly thanks to excitement from the bright stars near its center.

This bat is huge! Fills the field of view of my widest telescope/camera combo (approx 9 full moons wide).  Although they call it the "flying bat", I see it more as an oyster shell, complete with pearl in the middle.

Attempted it on two dark, moonless nights from a rural area. As they say, there's no substitute for truly dark skies.

Details:

LHaRGB = 110:60:30:30:40 minutes

Telescope = Takahashi FSQ-85EDX
Camera = STL-11000M
Mount = EQ6 Pro
Software = capture, stacking and alignment in MaximDL; mosaicking, levels and cropping in Photoshop
Location = Captured from eastern Ontario, mag 6 moonless skies, on July 25-27 2011

ngc 7023 the iris nebula

ngc 7023 the iris nebula

Takahashi FSQ 85
QSI583wsg
Mach One
10 x 10m Luminance
16 x 5m RGB respectively
-20C camera temp
Muskoka Detour IPA